Hohner Hohner Amica IV 96 Jet Black More accordion for creative performaces. The added fourth voice in the Amica 4-voice models brings 11 different timbres into existence. 4 stars, based on 1 reviews 0 5
$3349.00

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Home / Shop / New Instruments / Accordions / Piano Accordions

Hohner Amica IV 96 Jet Black

1 Reviews
$4184.00$3,349.00
Hohner Amica IV 96 Jet Black
Hohner Amica IV 96 Jet Black

Home / Shop / New Instruments / Accordions / Piano Accordions

Hohner Amica IV 96 Jet Black

$4184.00$3,349.00
Model Number: AMIV96BN
More accordion for creative performaces.
The added fourth voice in the Amica 4-voice models brings 11 different timbres into existence.
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3349.004
Manufacturer: Hohner
  • Description
  • Specifications
  • Customer Reviews (1)

More accordion for creative performances. Who does not want greater choice of timbres to move freely around the whole wide world of accordion music?

The added fourth voice in the Amica 4-voice models brings 11 different timbres into existence. This makes it perfect for use in orchestras as well as on stage in keeping with the standard of all HOHNER accordions.

Model Amica IV 96
Color black
Reed plate quality standard
number of notes 37
Class chromatic
Piano keys 37
lowest note F
highest note F
Voices 4
Tone colors 11
Number of registers 11
Standard basses 96
Standard bass voices 4
Standard bass registers 3
Size (height x width) 44 cm x 18,5 cm
weight 9,1 kg
Straps straps
Case hard shell case
Case trolley hard shell case with trolley

1 Reviews for Hohner Amica IV 96 Jet Black

    Hohner Amica IV 96 Jet Black
    I am a sort-of “early-intermediate” level player (not nearly as proficient as other advanced-intermediate players I know). I learned on a 60-year old Excelsior Accordiana, and I currently play a 40-year old, 28-pound, full-sized,4/5 Paolo Sorani. Given the size and weight of the Paolo Soprani, I have difficulty playing for longer periods, and am not able to stand while playing very long or very comfortably. For these reasons, I recently began looking for a smaller, lighter, accordion.

    I tried the 96-bass, 4/4 Amica IV for a week in my home. At 20 pounds and 17 ½ inches (2 inches shorter than my Paolo) the Amica definitely met my requirements for reducing size and weight. It is ideal in that respect, really a very nice-handling accordion. Its balance seemed fine to me as well (which is a point worth making because I have heard that some players consider the 120-bass Amica to be poorly balanced). The Amica’s bellows are tight, the keyboard action is good, and it is able to produce an adequate volume level. In the midrange, it has a very nice, bright sound. The Master stop is capable and has decent tone. But the bass response is poor. The entire bass (left hand) section sounds anemic and tinny, more like mid-bass than genuine bass. It does not provide a satisfying bottom-end by any standard. In the right hand, the bassoon (low octave) reeds are equally week an insubstantial, making the “organ” register (usually one of my favorites) far too bright, and the “bandoneon” stop with little of the characteristic warmth it should have. The “violin” (tremolo/musette) register is not satisfying either; I’m not sure whether it is just too dry for my taste (surprising for a Hohner) or whether the reeds are so thin-sounding that the tremolo just has no body to it. Physically, the register switches themselves (both on the treble side, as well as the bass side) seem very delicate (even flimsy) and they do not provide sufficient tactile feedback to give the player confidence that the register change has taken effect. Obviously, this is meant to be a lightweight instrument, so it should not be expected that the controls will not be heavy-duty. Still, the overall impression I have is that the controls on the Amica are of poor build quality, and I suspect they may not be very durable. That, in combination with the poor bass and bassoon reeds, and the indistinct tremolo, motivated me to pass on the Amica and stick with my old Paolo Soprani for now.

    I think that for an entry-level or intermediate player the Amica may be ideal. But if you, like me, have had the benefit of enjoying the sound quality of a really good Italian or German accordion, the Amica will definitely not be a satisfying instrument.
    Rating: 4 out of 5
  • Plusses are size and weight; minuses are thin sound and mediocre build quality - Tuesday, June 21, 2016
    I am a sort-of “early-intermediate” level player (not nearly as proficient as other advanced-intermediate players I know). I learned on a 60-year old Excelsior Accordiana, and I currently play a 40-year old, 28-pound, full-sized,4/5 Paolo Sorani. Given the size and weight of the Paolo Soprani, I have difficulty playing for longer periods, and am not able to stand while playing very long or very comfortably. For these reasons, I recently began looking for a smaller, lighter, accordion.

    I tried the 96-bass, 4/4 Amica IV for a week in my home. At 20 pounds and 17 ½ inches (2 inches shorter than my Paolo) the Amica definitely met my requirements for reducing size and weight. It is ideal in that respect, really a very nice-handling accordion. Its balance seemed fine to me as well (which is a point worth making because I have heard that some players consider the 120-bass Amica to be poorly balanced). The Amica’s bellows are tight, the keyboard action is good, and it is able to produce an adequate volume level. In the midrange, it has a very nice, bright sound. The Master stop is capable and has decent tone. But the bass response is poor. The entire bass (left hand) section sounds anemic and tinny, more like mid-bass than genuine bass. It does not provide a satisfying bottom-end by any standard. In the right hand, the bassoon (low octave) reeds are equally week an insubstantial, making the “organ” register (usually one of my favorites) far too bright, and the “bandoneon” stop with little of the characteristic warmth it should have. The “violin” (tremolo/musette) register is not satisfying either; I’m not sure whether it is just too dry for my taste (surprising for a Hohner) or whether the reeds are so thin-sounding that the tremolo just has no body to it. Physically, the register switches themselves (both on the treble side, as well as the bass side) seem very delicate (even flimsy) and they do not provide sufficient tactile feedback to give the player confidence that the register change has taken effect. Obviously, this is meant to be a lightweight instrument, so it should not be expected that the controls will not be heavy-duty. Still, the overall impression I have is that the controls on the Amica are of poor build quality, and I suspect they may not be very durable. That, in combination with the poor bass and bassoon reeds, and the indistinct tremolo, motivated me to pass on the Amica and stick with my old Paolo Soprani for now.

    I think that for an entry-level or intermediate player the Amica may be ideal. But if you, like me, have had the benefit of enjoying the sound quality of a really good Italian or German accordion, the Amica will definitely not be a satisfying instrument.
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